Please forward this error screen to 199. 100,000 sitting in cash that I’d best stocks to invest in today to invest.

What’s the best way to do that in today’s market? Given today’s gaseous stock valuations and concerns that this eight-and-a-half-year bull market might be getting a little long in the tooth, it’s understandable why many investors are skittish about investing money in stocks. So what should you do if you have new money to invest — whether it’s a hundred grand, ten grand or for that matter any amount — and you don’t want to give up stocks’ potential upside but you also don’t want to get hit with losses you can’t handle? The first is to try to time your entry into the market.

So, for example, if you think this bull market still has room to run, you put your money into stocks, but stand ready to exit quickly when you’re convinced the market is about to tumble. This strategy sounds great, but the problem is pulling it off. Since the market began its phenomenal surge back in early 2009 in the wake of the financial crisis, there have been many times when soothsayers suggested the stock market, like Humpty-Dumpty, was headed for a great fall. In 2011, the downgrading of the rating of U.

Poor’s was expected to be the catalyst for a significant setback. Apparently, the stock market didn’t get the message because it continued to rise. That’s not to say that at some point, some prediction of its demise won’t be correct. We pretty much know the market will eventually hit a wall. The second option is dollar-cost-averaging, or investing your money gradually, say, over the course of a year or so rather than all at once. But while this strategy will provide some downside protection if your call about the market’s direction is correct, it doesn’t make much financial sense. One reason is that the stock market historically has had more up years than down, which means you’re more likely to come out ahead investing your dough all at once rather than moving it from cash to stocks a bit at a time.

Which brings us to the third, and I think most sensible, option, which is to set a mix of stocks and bonds that you’ll be comfortable sticking with in good markets and bad and immediately investing any new money to reflect those proportions. If the amount of new money was very large relative to your current holdings — say, it would double or nearly double the size of your portfolio — you could conceivably decide to take more, or less, investing risk, in which case you would revise your overall stocks-bonds mix and invest the new funds based on your new mix. But aside from such an extreme situation, you would essentially invest any new money in a way that reflects your current allocation. But, you may ask, what if stock market drops right after I do this? Won’t I have taken a bigger hit than if I’d stayed in cash longer or invested my money gradually?